Lampman Family

Description:
A photo of the Lampman family: Back row, right side is my great grandfather Elwin Lampman (1853-1937). He is surrounded by his siblings from left: Lucinda Jane Merrifield (1835-1924), Lewis Lampman (1842-1921), Dr. John Crawford Lampman (1838-1925). Ladies seated, from left: Elizabeth Ann Lampman (1836-1912), Permilla M Gilbert (1840-1925)
Date & Place:
People:
Bio
1840 - 1925
Bio
1836 - 1912
Bio
1838 - 1925
Bio
1842 - 1921
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Age: 58
Added
Updated Aug 20, 2019

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Comments

Ancient Faces
446 favorites
What's so amazing about this 1911 photo of siblings? The youngest was born almost a decade before the Civil War!
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Angela Svirbely
Wonder if the 3 women are widows
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Teresa Chmelik
Angela Svirbely 3 women? The one standing looks like a pastor.
Aug 20, 2019 ·
Ree Young
236 favorites
Teresa Chmelik Did you read the names?

Lucinda is the one standing; her married name was Merrifield. Elizabeth is seated near Lucinda, but she is still identified with her maiden name. Women, once married, didn't generally take back their maiden names. Instead of being known as Mrs. John Smith, widows were known as Mrs. Mary Smith. This was still being done right into the 1960s in newspapers. The other woman seated is Permilla; her married name is Gilbert.

I don't see a wedding ring on Lucinda's left hand, so maybe she was a widow. But Permilla is wearing a ring on the third finger of her left hand, which might indicate she was married at the time...though she could have also been a widow. I wore my wedding band for quite a long time after my husband died.

It used to be the custom for a widow or widower to wear the wedding band on the right hand after the spouse died.
Aug 20, 2019 ·
Marilyn Short Dauw
no one smiled
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Teresa Chmelik
There really wasn’t much to smile about back then.
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Anya Tang
Teresa Chmelik check out this Instagram account. They have a lot old pictures with people actually smiling at camera
Aug 20, 2019 ·
Ann Lucas
Wealthy family if the clothes tell a story and able to afford portrait.
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Trudie Cruey
somehow, I don't they are happy
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Kimberly Pruitt
People didn't smile for pictures back then it just wasn't done
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Audrey Dupaix
Wonderful photo !
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Puente Diane
Awesome picture!
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Doris Padgett
I wonder what color their dresses were! All ladies' clothes looked black
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Margaret Tinsley Rodgers
One feature seems the same in each or close are the noses. But why in all those old pictures are they so somber and in drab clothing.
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Beverly Klaus Stufflebeam
Margaret Tinsley Rodgers the somber faces are most likely because of the lengthy process for photos. They had to hold the pose for quiet some time. Cameras did not just click and done then. You had to stay extremely still facially and all. It was a truly long process.
Aug 21, 2019 ·
Margaret Tinsley Rodgers
Beverly Klaus Stufflebeam interesting. I had no idea. Thank you
Aug 21, 2019 ·
Joy Passio Curley
They look so miserable. And not to be mean but they all look the same age. Real old
Aug 20, 2019 · Reply
Bill Henrie
My dad was born in 1910...
Aug 21, 2019 · Reply
Dede Sampson Perkins
No smiling because of poor dental care.
Aug 21, 2019 · Reply
Margaret Tinsley Rodgers
Dede Sampson Perkins your probably right on that one
Aug 21, 2019 ·
Monika Vikingstad Midttveit
Also; Back then the photo would take so long to develope that it would be hard to keep a smile for up to a minute straight. Much easier to just relax your mouth then.
Aug 21, 2019 ·
Linda Virtue
Dede Sampson Perkins that is not the reason.
Aug 23, 2019 ·
Rich Perry
This is a photo of my ancestors taken around 1900. As you can see, not many smiling faces. I just don’t think it was customary back then. My grandfather, born in 1881, is second from the left in the back row. My great grandfather seated on the left front row, and my great grandmother seated on the right front row, were also born before the civil war began.
Aug 21, 2019 · Reply
Linda Virtue
Rich Perry exposure time was so long that it was hard to hold a smile that looked normal. You'd end up looking insane.
Aug 23, 2019 ·
Sandy Mastin
Almost haunting!
Aug 23, 2019 · Reply
Pat Hatley
It could have been a photo taken at a funeral when everyone could get together all dressed up.
Aug 23, 2019 · Reply
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