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Hansen Family History & Genealogy

88 photos and 74,606 biographies with the Hansen last name. Discover the family history, nationality, origin and common names of Hansen family members.
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Hansen Last Name History & Origin

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Updated Oct 09, 2021

Summary

Denmark origins

History

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Name Origin

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Spellings & Pronunciations

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Nationality & Ethnicity

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Famous People named Hansen

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Early Hansens

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Hansen Death Records & Life Expectancy

The average age of a Hansen family member is 72.4 years old according to our database of 59,903 people with the last name Hansen that have a birth and death date listed.

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Other Hansen Records

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Karolyn Herrera commented
My mom (Sylvia Hansen/maiden name Wheatley) learned this recipe at the blind school she went to when she was young, and my sisters and I have made it dozens of times since she passed it on to us. We usually make it without nuts, but of course, you can add them if you'd like. Banana Bread Temp. 350° 1 hour Yields 1 Loaf/16 slices 1 ¾ cup Flour 2 teaspoons Baking Powder ¼ teaspoon Baking Soda ½ teaspoon Salt 1/3 cup shortening/butter/margarine 2/3 cup sugar 2 eggs well beaten 1 cup mashed, ripe bananas ½ cup chopped nuts (optional) 1 teaspoon vanilla (I use 2 teaspoons) Mash bananas with pasty blender until no lumps remain. Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Beat shortening/butter and sugar together with a wooden spoon until creamy. Then, add eggs and beat well. Add the sifted dry ingredients alternately together with the bananas to the sugar mixture. Beat until smooth. Stir in nuts if using. Add vanilla. Grease the pan(s) with butter/margarine. I either use my hand or put my hand in a plastic bag and spread a scoop of butter around all sides. Works better than PAM or anything else. Lightly flour the pan(s). Bake @ 350° for 1 hour – large breadpan; 2 small pans – 40 minutes *I set the timer for 30 minutes, then take the bread out. I then spread melted butter over the top of the partially baked loaf. Then, I set the timer for another 20 minutes, because sometimes it doesn't take the full hour. Test middle with knife (ok if no gooey stuff left on). If not okay, bake another 10-15 minutes. When done, pop loaf out of pan and spread butter on edges that were against the pan. This keeps it from being dry. Enjoy! -Alicia, Karolyn, Kathy Hansen-
Oct 08, 2005  ·  Reply
Kathy Greenawalt commented
My grandfather told this story to me shortly before he died. His sister, Lillian Hansen Segers told me the story was true. My grandfather (Albert Sidney Hansen) wanted to make sure that the family history lived on...and through me, it will. My greatgreatgrandfather was Hans Sorensen. He was the tailor to the king of Denmark (I believe King Christian). Hans lived with his family in Schleswig-Holstein (which was part of Denmark at the time. It is now part of Germany.) Hans and Lena Sorensen raised 13 children. My greatgrandfather was John Hansen (In Denmark, sen means son, so he was the son of Hans.) He had a brother Peter (who came to America with him), a brother, Walter, who ended up in Australia, and another 10 brothers and sisters. But, I am getting ahead of myself. Hans Sorensen made fine clothing for the king and his family. One time, someone invaded the castle, threatening the king's life. Hans stopped the person from hurting the king and received some medals for doing so (they were in my greatgrandfather's possession but were lost in a fire). Later, when Hans had a stroke and could not work any more, the king let him stay in the castle and took care of the family....but, the king died and I believe his cousin became king. Hans, Lena and the family were thrown out...they had no money and a hungry family to feed, so the children were sent to live with people as endentured servants. John and Peter went to live with a harness maker, but the man abused them severely. John and Peter jumped a cargo ship and stowed away. They were found and became cabin boys to pay their keep. They stayed on this ship for awhile but eventually ended up in New York. They made their way west ending up in Sherman, Texas, where they started the Hansen Carpet Company. John met and married my great-grandmother, Minnie Orena Givens, who was Native American (Comanche and possibly Cherokee). Orena means Laughing Water. The two made a life together in Galveston Texas. They later moved to California in or about 1921...moving to Berkeley, CA. They stayed in the bay area and raised a family. Minnie's brother, Albert Sidney Givens must have eventually moved out west too because his descendants live in Washington state. My grandfather, Albert Sidney Hansen was named after this uncle (something I learned only a few years ago.) Anyway, John and Minnie raised a big family, Richard (Dickey) Lillian, Albert, William, Bryan, Dewey and a few others..Richard had a twin that died...John stayed in the carpet business, taught that to my grandfather..my grandfather taught it to his son...My father learned it also from my grandfather (his father-in-law). Sewing was in our blood...my Great-Aunt Lilly (Lillian) worked in a factory, making clothing. My mother, Virginia Alberta Hansen Wilson made clothing for us 5 girls without using a pattern!! My sister made a beautiful wedding dress at the age of 17...the rest of us girls sew fairly well..I have cousins on both sides of the family that are carpet layers and now their children are carpet layers...and it all started with Hans Sorensen, tailor to the king of Denmark...I had heard a rumor that some of Hans work was displayed in the Mary Hill Museum in Washington State...but by the time I got there, the clothes had been taken to France to be displayed in another museum...there was supposed to be a dress covered in gold coins...Well, that's about it...Oh, by the way, on my grandmother, Arlene Thurber Hansen's side, we are related to Janet Leigh and Jamie Lee Curtis...but that is another story
Dec 01, 2007  ·  Reply
Kathy Greenawalt commented
My grandfather told this story to me shortly before he died. His sister, Lillian Hansen Segers told me the story was true. My grandfather (Albert Sidney Hansen) wanted to make sure that the family history lived on...and through me, it will. My greatgreatgrandfather was Hans Sorensen. He was the tailor to the king of Denmark (I believe King Christian). Hans lived with his family in Schleswig-Holstein (which was part of Denmark at the time. It is now part of Germany.) Hans and Lena Sorensen raised 13 children. My greatgrandfather was John Hansen (In Denmark, sen means son, so he was the son of Hans.) He had a brother Peter (who came to America with him), a brother, Walter, who ended up in Australia, and another 10 brothers and sisters. But, I am getting ahead of myself. Hans Sorensen made fine clothing for the king and his family. One time, someone invaded the castle, threatening the king's life. Hans stopped the person from hurting the king and received some medals for doing so (they were in my greatgrandfather's possession but were lost in a fire). Later, when Hans had a stroke and could not work any more, the king let him stay in the castle and took care of the family....but, the king died and I believe his cousin became king. Hans, Lena and the family were thrown out...they had no money and a hungry family to feed, so the children were sent to live with people as endentured servants. John and Peter went to live with a harness maker, but the man abused them severely. John and Peter jumped a cargo ship and stowed away. They were found and became cabin boys to pay their keep. They stayed on this ship for awhile but eventually ended up in New York. They made their way west ending up in Sherman, Texas, where they started the Hansen Carpet Company. John met and married my great-grandmother, Minnie Orena Givens, who was part Native American (Comanche and possibly Cherokee). Orena means Laughing Water. The two made a life together in Galveston Texas. They later moved to California.
Dec 01, 2007  ·  Reply
Lori Russell commented
I have been searching the same family. Around Montcalm Michigan. I have a John Johnson living in Fenwick. With a Caroline. Bunch of them kids. But there is a Hans Or Christian Johnson in this area. All coming from Denmark too.
Oct 06  ·  Reply
Lori Russell commented
I have a Robert Hansen who was a pharmacist . For Hansen drugstore in Sheridan Michigan. The name of the building he owned by Robert Hansen. Well the building had a fire in 1955.
Oct 06  ·  Reply
Malodie Andersen commented
Hi! Where was your Hansen's from in Sweden/Norway? Best regards, Malodie
Oct 08  ·  Reply
Lori Russell commented
Sweden I believe? Not certain
Oct 08  ·  Reply
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